UCSF

2018 News

Ortiz de Montellano
Ortiz de Montellano gained renown for his work with cytochrome P450 enzymes, which help the liver metabolize drugs and other chemicals, and regulate hormone levels.
composite of Langridge, Kollman, Kuntz, and a wasabi receptor computer graphic
Drug discovery today begins with computation rather than test tube experimentation. Three School of Pharmacy faculty emeriti, Robert Langridge, Irwin “Tack” Kuntz, and the late Peter Kollman, were awarded the UCSF Medal for creating computational tools for drug discovery that are now used worldwide.
Guglielmo
Curriculum transformation, An expanded role, Gaining recognition, Graduate match rate; School of Pharmacy scientists receive UCSF Medal: Founding fathers of drug discovery honored; Beyond drugs, Two artificial pancreas projects, Bringing prosthetics to patients; Beyond drugs, Two artificial pancreas projects, Bringing prosthetics to patients; Advancing the fight against cancer, Combining drug therapies, Mapping cells; In memoriam: Robert D. Gibson A lifetime of pharmacy and advocacy
Krogan
UCSF’s Quantitative Biosciences Institute (QBI), founded two years ago, is making waves with its unique approach to scientific collaboration, catalyzing discoveries from cancer to psychiatry while supporting female scientists and engaging with the public.
Pharmaceutical Chemistry department members have received the following grants and fellowships between July and September 2018: 09/30/2018: Adam Renslo received the US Army Medical Research Activity Award, Department of Defense, for work on prostate cancer. This project will be funded for three years. 09/13/2018: Michelle Arkin received a one-time charitable award from the Rainwater Charitable Foundation to fund neurodegenerative research.
Arkin
Michelle Arkin, PhD, has received the 2018 Breakthrough Science Initiative Award from the Ono Pharma Foundation to study a class of proteins, called 14-3-3 proteins, known to be involved in various cancers, with the ultimate goal of enabling discoveries that lead to new ways to treat cancer.
Gibson
A beloved educator and alumnus of the UCSF School of Pharmacy, Robert D. Gibson, PharmD ’58, died on July 19 at the age of 93. Gibson had an illustrious career over five decades at UCSF and was a strong national leader for diversity in the pharmacy profession.
Guglielmo
Medical errors are the third leading cause of death in the U.S., trailing cancer and heart disease. Many of those errors can be traced to issues with medications. By diligently tracking the medications that each patient takes, and bringing trained pharmacists into the fold of everyday patient care, our health system could be made more effective and safer, UCSF School of Pharmacy Dean B. Joseph Guglielmo, PharmD, explains in a recent article for The Conversation.
cells under microscope.
If it’s hard to take an accurate census of the 325 million people living in the US, it’s even more daunting to survey the 37.2 trillion or so cells that make up the human body. The brain alone, for instance, contains nearly 90 billion neurons, which can be classified into over a thousand distinct cell types. But these numbers are informed estimates—the true diversity of cells in the brain, let alone throughout the body, remains out of reach.
Guglielmo
Health at the molecular level: Decoding cellular signals, A trigger for tissue repair, Seeding tomorrow’s science; The future of custom care: Tracking cancer drug resistance, Treating malaria and tuberculosis, Quantitative Biosciences Institute’s culture of inclusivity, The genetics of asthma; Ensuring the best possible care: Using the right drugs, Keeping up with the testing boom; Update on the new PharmD curriculum: Welcoming our new students at the end of July; more.
Study captures an opioid drug binding to a µ-opioid receptor
Despite using opioids for centuries for pain management, we still don’t have a complete understanding of how drugs like morphine and oxycodone actually work. And that’s a problem for patients, who must weather side effects that can range from nausea and constipation to cognitive impairment, addiction, and, at high doses, even death.
Guglielmo speaks at podium.
For UCSF School of Pharmacy alumni who attended the event, Alumni Weekend 2018 offered a chance to explore how science connects the School’s research, education, and patient care agendas; learn about the lives and professional accomplishments of pharmacy school graduates; and get a glimpse of what’s under way at UCSF beyond the School. The annual campuswide event was held at the Hyatt Regency San Francisco on June 1 and 2.
Manglik
Aashish Manglik, MD, PhD, the newest member of the faculty of the UCSF School of Pharmacy’s Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, was named a Pew Biomedical Scholar on June 14. The award supports early career faculty members who have demonstrated “outstanding promise as contributors in science relevant to human health,” and provides each awardee with $300,000 over four years to help them get their growing labs off the ground.
UCSF Magazine summer 2018
UCSF School of Pharmacy scientists, across all three departments and in widely divergent fields, are continually questioning the status quo.
Seiple
The Beckman Young Investigator award provides research support to the most promising young faculty members in the early stages of their academic careers in the chemical and life sciences.
smiling graduate
The 122 members of the graduating class of 2018 received their PharmD degrees at the commencement ceremony.
Pharmaceutical Chemistry department members have received the following grants and fellowships between April and June 2018: 5/4/2018: Bo Huang received funding from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences for his project entitled, “Structure mapping of molecular complexes by super-resolution microscopy.” This project will be funded until March 2022.
Sali
Andrej Sali, PhD, has been elected as a member of the 2018 class of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS).
Pharmaceutical Chemistry department members have received the following grants and fellowships between January and March 2018: 02/20/2018: Adam Renslo was awarded a three-year grant for his project entitled, “Expanding the Chemical Biology of K2P Channels with Selective Cellular and In vivo Probes.” This project is funded by the National Institute of Mental Health.
Kennedy
Kathleen B. Kennedy, PharmD ’78, has been named our Distinguished Alumnus of the Year.
Burlingame with scientific equipment.
Collaborative research holds promise for harnessing the nervous system’s own repair programs.
Lei Wang and Nanxi Wang
A culture of discovery and collaboration among faculty carries potential to “completely shake up their fields of study.”
diagram
If DNA is the blueprint for every cell in the body, then proteins are the cell’s construction workers, forklifts, and building materials.
Guglielmo.
A new PharmD curriculum; Implementing new practice opportunities for pharmacists; PharmD students shine in state and national clinical pharmacy competitions; A pioneer in pharmacogenomics; The NIH streak lives on; Improving adverse event reporting and medication therapy protocols; Big-data to cut drug discovery time; Computational approaches target dopamine receptors; Researchers expose industry manipulation of science by sugar industry; Women in science; more.
Koda-Kimble
The 2018 Mary Anne Koda-Kimble Seed Award for Innovation marked its fourth year of funding with the announcement of the research award recipients.
Youmans and Burningham
Vice Dean Sharon L. Youmans shares her perspective on the School’s new PharmD curriculum.
Wells
Scientists identify a signature of cancers caused by mutant RAS that may lead to precise therapies.
Huang at reception
Even with the best of microscopes, it's still a challenge to visualize the "inner life" of the cell.
illustration of mouse embryo and folded tissue shapes
Researchers were able to coax layers of cells to form shapes not found in nature, such as cubes.